School Orders Teachers: Stop Calling Students “Boys” And “Girls”

schoolkids

In the ongoing effort to confuse the living hell out of kids and completely enrage parents, a North Carolina school district is recommending that children not be called “boys” and “girls.”

Rather, they say, they should be called “scholars” and “students.”


The idiotic recommendation – from the Charlotte-Mecklenberg School District is part – they say – of an effort to crack down on bullying at schools, WSOC is reporting.

Also included in the recommendations allows boys to go on overnight “all-girls” field trips and only allow “gender-based” activities if they serve a “clear and sound pedagogical purpose.”

Clearly, these school officials have no clue how young children self-identify – as a “boy” or a “girl” and to minimize that identification will do more harm than the perceived benefit of calling a boy who wants to be a girl “Sally” instead of “Timmy.”

This all started with the introduction of the “gender unicorn,” a handout produced by “Trans Student Educational Resources” that proclaims there are five characteristics of gender (identity, expression, sex, physical attraction and emotional attraction”) and that all of them can run up and down a sliding scale.

gender unicorn


This has rankled parents and conservative groups. The North Carolina Values Coalition said not only are the new rules wildly too radical, but they’re a violation of a child’s inherit right to privacy.

“School is no longer about reading, writing and arithmetic. It is now about gender fluidity,” Tami Fitzgerald of the NC Values Coalition said.

CMS officials say the policies in the presentation are meant to serve as guidelines.

“CMS remains fully committed to supporting its transgender students and nurturing a safe and welcoming environment for every student and employee,” CMS Chief Communications Officer Kathryn Block said.

This is all patently idiotic.



Robert Gehl

About Robert Gehl

Robert Gehl is a college professor in Phoenix, Arizona. He has over 15 years journalism experience, including two Associated Press awards. He lives in Glendale with his wife and two young children.