Anti-Fracking Scientist Runs From Reporter After Admitting He Has No Proof That Fracking Poisoned Water

scientist hides

A so-called “scientist” that radical environmentalists used to attack fracking fled from reporters after being forced to admit in court that there was simply no proof that drilling contaminated the drinking water in a small Pennsylvania town.

Cornell University Engineering professor Tony Ingraffeta was forced to admit that he was, in fact, an anti-fossil-fuel advocate and not an objective scientist in a lawsuit between two Dimock, South Dakota families and the company Cabot Oil. Ingraffeta also admitted he had no proof that the fracking done by the oil company contaminated the drinking water of the families.

“Fracknation” filmmaker and journalist Phelim McAleer has been covering the trial. He previously reported that the lawyer for the families was forced to admit they had no proof at all that any fracking chemicals ever ended up in the drinking water.


He encountered Ingraffeta outside the courtroom. The professor is normally a media hound, appearing at protests with celebrities like Mark Ruffalo and Yoko Ono and appearing in both Gasland documentaries. But after he admitted he was a fraud, he hid from McAleer.

After Admitting He Has No Evidence about Dimock, Tony Ingraffe…“It’s sad that people such as Professor Ingraffea can make so many damaging claims, scaring people, telling them their water is poisoned, and all these years later admit in a court that he never had any evidence to back up his scaremongering.” https://www.facebook.com/notes/fracknation/after-admitting-he-has-no-evidence-about-dimock-tony-ingraffea-hides-and-runs/1038856022845931

Posted by FrackNation on Wednesday, March 2, 2016

“It has been a rough few days for Professor Ingraffea, the anti-fracking movement’s favorite scientist,” McAleer wrote on Facebook Wednesday. “Professor Ingraffea was forced to admit that he’s an anti-fracking and anti-fossil fuel ‘advocate.’”

“He admitted that his theory contradicted the plaintiffs’ own timeline,” McAleer continued. “Under Ingraffea’s theory, the ‘contamination’ could only have started in late 2008/early 2009 because that was when the gas drilling started; however, the plaintiffs have stated repeatedly that their water allegedly deteriorated in the summer of 2008 before the drilling Ingraffea has been blaming for the past 8 years.”

“Then Ingraffea shockingly admitted that after eight years of claims and multi-million dollar lawsuits, he had no proof that Cabot had contaminated any water in Dimock,” McAleer wrote.


When McAleer approached Ingraffea outside the courtroom, he could be seen trying to dodge the reporter and even hiding under a lady’s coat.

“I wanted to know if, after admitting under oath that he had no evidence to back up his claims that Dimock’s water was contaminated, he would now take the opportunity to apologize to the people of Dimock. He didn’t. He ran away,” McAleer wrote.

Ingraffea became an eco-celebrity after he and a colleague published a report in 2011 claiming methane emissions from fracking would cause more global warming than coal, The Daily Caller is reporting. He was then taped by anti-fracking celebrities, like actor Mark Ruffalo and Yoko Ono (no one really knows why she’s still famous), for his criticisms of fracking — he and Ruffalo appeared in TIME magazine in 2011 for their activism.

Ingraffea also made an appearance in the anti-fracking film “Gasland: Part II” in 2013. In the film, he claims “industry documents” show 60 percent of all fracked wells failed, but this claim was later proven false — the document cited in the film had nothing to do with fracking on land, but instead with drilling in deeps waters in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ingraffea has since appeared at numerous events alongside celebrities, speaking out against fracking and fossil fuels.

“It’s sad that people such as Professor Ingraffea can make so many damaging claims, scaring people, telling them their water is poisoned, and all these years later admit in a court that he never had any evidence to back up his scaremongering,” McAleer wrote.