BREAKING: Voting Machines STOLEN Before Georgia Special Election

Voting machines being used in Georgia’s special election were stolen just days before the polls officially opened.

WSB-TV is reporting that state officials are investigating after elections equipment was taken from a precinct manager’s vehicle in Cobb County while the vehicle was parked.

What’s got everyone so mad? Secretary of State Brian Kemp said the county elections officials waited two days before telling him about the theft of the machines.

The “ExpressPoll” machines were the computers that poll workers use to check in voters and check off those who have cast ballots.

“It’s very shocking, especially with the climate we have of voter fraud out there,” one Georgia voter told Channel 2’s Ross Cavitt.

READ MORE:
WSB-TV: Equipment stolen days before special election; Sec. of State: ‘Unacceptable’
Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionBreaking: Voters’ personal data at risk in Cobb theft
Business Insider: 4 voting machines stolen ahead of a high-profile special election in Georgia

Machines can’t be used to vote: Cobb County Elections Director Janine Eveler said the stolen machines cannot be used to fraudulently vote in the election. She said the machines have voter information on them, but that information is “hard to access.”

“We have managed that so that what’s stolen could not impact the election,” Eveler said.

While the file includes drivers’ license numbers, addresses and other data, it does not include Social Security numbers, Eveler said.

But, she said, “the poll book that was stolen did have a flash card with a voter list on it. But, it does require some knowledge or expertise to use machine to retrieve the information.”

The machines will be replaced. Eveler said they will completely replace the machines at the Piedmont Road precinct.

“It should be as secure as the banks, or anywhere else with our information,” another voter said.

Kemp released the following statement Monday afternoon: “It is unacceptable that the Cobb County Elections Office waited two days to notify my office of this theft. We have opened an investigation, and we are taking steps to ensure that it has no effect on the election tomorrow. I am confident that the results will not be compromised.”


Robert Gehl

About Robert Gehl

Robert Gehl is a college professor in Phoenix, Arizona. He has over 15 years journalism experience, including two Associated Press awards. He lives in Glendale with his wife and two young children.

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