JUST RELEASED: Pentagon Issues Statement On ‘Ground Invasion’ In North Korea

Since Donald Trump has entered the White House, tension has increased between the United States and North Korea–substantially.

The haunting question clouding D.C.: how serious is Kim Jong-Un? The same man Trump refers to as the “Rocket Man”.

What does his nuclear arsenal look like? How many weapons? How destructive are these weapons?

Does Jong-un want war with the United States?

Will he invade and be an aggressor in the Korean Peninsula?

And how do we find out these answers?

Trump believes there is little use to negotiate with the “little Rocket Man” and has been “hinting that he is considering preemptive military force”.

The only way, it seems, to get accurate information on who and what we are dealing with is to invade.

According to The Washington Post:

The only way to locate and secure all of North Korea’s nuclear weapons sites “with complete certainty” is through an invasion of ground forces, and in the event of conflict, Pyongyang could use biological and chemical weapons, the Pentagon told lawmakers in a new, blunt assessment of what war on the Korean Peninsula might look like.

The Pentagon, in a letter to lawmakers, said that a full discussion of U.S. capabilities to “counter North Korea’s ability to respond with a nuclear weapon and to eliminate North Korea’s nuclear weapons located in deeply buried, underground facilities” is best suited for a classified briefing.

The letter also said that Pentagon leaders “assess that North Korea may consider the use of biological weapons” and that the country “has a long-standing chemical weapons program with the capability to produce nerve, blister, blood and choking agents.”

The Pentagon repeated that a detailed discussion of how the United States would respond to the threat could not be discussed in public…

…The Pentagon said that calculating “best- or worst-case casualty scenarios” was challenging and would depend on the “nature, intensity and duration” of a North Korean attack; how much warning civilians would have to get to the thousands of shelters in South Korea; and the ability of U.S. and South Korean forces to respond to North Korean artillery, rockets and ballistic missiles with their own retaliatory barrage and airstrikes.

If the United States did attempt to seek out North Korean nukes, it would likely be led by U.S. Special Operations forces.

But, we’ve been reminded by a senior U.S. military official who is currently stationed in South Korea that this isn’t the first time North Korea and the United States have been on the precipice of aggression.

“If you open the history books, this is not the first time that we’ve been in a heavy provocation cycle,” the official said. On the side of South Korea and the United States, he said, “there is no action taken without extreme consideration of not putting this in a position where a fight is going to happen.”

That isn’t to suggest, however, that lawmakers want Trump to continue making “provocative statements” on Twitter and elsewhere to “impede diplomatic efforts and risk the lives of U.S. troops”.

What are your thoughts with North Korea? Is invasion inevitable?