New Holes Emerge In Loretta Lynch Testimony; Did She LIE To Congress?

It appears that former Attorney General Loretta Lynch lied to Congress when she told lawmakers she never talked to anyone in the Clinton campaign about her decision not to seek prosecution in the email scandal.

Testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, Lynch gave a categorical denial that she ever talked to anyone in Hillary Clinton’s campaign about the investigation. But the committee has recently learned of the existence of a document that indicates Lynch promised Clinton’s political director that she wouldn’t let FBI agents “go too far” in probing the former First Lady, The New York Post reports.

Lynch’s lawyer insists she is cooperating with investigators – who now have many questions. Among them are: Did Lynch ever communicate with Amanda Renteria – Clinton’s political director during the campaign? Renteria is the one who has been identified in the document as the senior Clinton campaign aide with whom Lynch privately communicated. She has also been asked to testify.

The committee also wants to know if Lynch or any of her aides were in contact with former DNC chief Debbie Wasserman Schultz regarding the Clinton e-mail investigation, according to a three-page list of questions that Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley and ranking Democrat Dianne Feinstein recently sent to Lynch at her New York apartment.

Senate investigators have combed through a transcript of Lynch’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee in July 2016. In retrospect, several of her statements strain credulity. But one in particular stands out, and could present legal problems for Lynch.

During the House Judiciary hearing, David Trott, a Michigan Congressman, condemned Lynch for not recusing herself from the Clinton investigation despite her infamous “Tarmac Meeting” with Bill Clinton one week before they let Hillary off scot-free.

Trott then asked Lynch if she had met with anyone on Hillary’s staff during the yearlong investigation, to which she replied: “I have not spoken to anyone on either the campaign or transition or any staff members affiliated with them.”

The committee, however, now knows of a document obtained by the FBI reportedly showing a Democratic operative’s claim that Lynch had privately assured Renteria that the Justice Department “would not push too deeply” into the investigation of Clinton’s private email server, which contained top secret information from the State Department.

And it will press her to explain the discrepancy — along with why she reportedly asked former FBI Director James Comey to leave her office when he confronted her with the document.

Could this be the binding tie?

Robert Gehl

About Robert Gehl

Robert Gehl is a college professor in Phoenix, Arizona. He has over 15 years journalism experience, including two Associated Press awards. He lives in Glendale with his wife and two young children.