REPORT: National Reciprocity Bill Has TROJAN HORSE Gun Control Provision

According to Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.), the Concealed Carry Reciprocity bill currently working its way through Congress will include a trojan horse, added by Democrats, that could make it more difficult for Americans to obtain guns.

The bill would allow concealed carry permits to remain valid across state lines, but the Senate version of the bill is cosponsored by Sens. Feintstein and Schumer and could expand the national background check database.

The House bill, according to Massie, also includes a commission for a study on bump-stocks.

He also claims the text of the bill was intentionally withheld from the public until after it passed a House committee measure.

Massie took to Facebook, “blowing the whistle on the swamp.”

Massie took to Facebook, “blowing the whistle on the swamp”:

ALERT: Feinstein/Schumer sponsored gun legislation that amends the “Brady bill” will be added to Concealed Carry Reciprocity bill (HR 38) in the House this week.

As Chairman of the Second Amendment Caucus, I’m blowing the whistle on the swamp. Last week, Republicans in the House fast tracked through committee HR 4477, a gun bill titled “fix-NICS.” The Senate version of this bill is cosponsored by Senator Dianne Feintstein and Senator Chuck Schumer and it will send $625 million over 5 years to states to expand the national background check database. The bill will also advance former President Obama’s agenda of pressuring every branch of the administration (such as the Veteran’s Administration) to submit thousands of more names to the NICS background check database to deny gun purchases. The House bill is identical in every way to the Senate bill except the House bill will also commission a study on bump-stocks.

What you don’t know, and what virtually no one in Washington wants you to know, is that House leadership plans to merge the fix-NICS bill with popular Concealed Carry Reciprocity legislation, HR 38, and pass both of them with a single vote. Folks, this is how the swamp works. House leadership expects constituents to call their representatives demanding a vote on the reciprocity bill, when in fact the only vote will be on the two combined bills.

How fast did Fix-NICS, HR 4477, move through the Judiciary Committee? This bill broke the previous records for fast track legislation. It was voted out of committee within hours of being introduced in the House. Check the dates on this link: https://www.congress.gov/…/115th-congr…/house-bill/4477/text . That means the text of the bill wasn’t even discoverable by the public on congress.gov until after the bill passed out of committee! The text was however available over in the Senate where you will find Senator Diane Feinstein and Senator Chuck Schumer are cosponsors.https://www.congress.gov/…/115t…/senate-bill/2135/cosponsors

[…] To recap, what are some clues that you should be concerned with the fix-NICS bill?

(1) The first sentence after the title of the bill reads “Section 103 of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (34 U.S.C. 40901) is amended…”
(2) Senators Dianne Feinstein and Chuck Schumer are cosponsors in the Senate.
(3) It’s being rammed through, without a hearing, in a very nontransparent process, and it will be passed by attaching it to the popular concealed carry reciprocity bill which already has enough votes to pass on its own.
(4) It spends over half a billion dollars to collect more names to include in a list of people who will never be allowed to own a firearm.
(5) It compels administrative agencies, not just courts, to adjudicate your second amendment rights.

Via “administrative agencies,” the bill will avoid due process if passed, adding names to a database that would restrict gun ownership for Americans.

That sidestep around due process is the same sort of bureaucratic trick we’ve seen with barring gun ownership for people on the “no fly list,” which also conveniently avoids due process.

According to a classified government documents obtained by 2014 Intercept report, nearly half of the people on the feds’ database of terrorist suspects have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation.”

As the LA Times reported:

Worse still, those who find themselves ensnared are able to do pretty much nothing about their predicaments. As the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon has put it, the setup is “arbitrary and capricious,” and represents an insult not only to the United States Constitution but to the Administrative Procedure Act as well.

Leaving the fate of unsuspecting Americans who can do nothing to remove themselves from an assigned database to “administrative agencies” seems to be the goal of the Concealed Carry Reciprocity bill’s Trojan horse.

Bureaucrats would, yet again, ignore the justice system and take it upon themselves to restrict individuals’ constitutional rights. That’s a representative role they were not elected to by those whose fate lies oddly in their hands.

It’s an old trick, and it seems to work every time.

As Massie points out:

When President Obama couldn’t get Congress to pass gun control, he implemented a strategy of compelling, through administrative rules, the Veterans Administration and the Social Security Administration to submit lists of veterans and seniors, many of whom never had a day in court, to be included in the NICS database of people prohibited from owning a firearm. Only a state court, a federal (article III) court, or a military court, should ever be able to suspend your rights for any significant period of time.

The word you’re looking for is unconstitutional. Don’t be afraid to say it.

Concealing the bill’s text was no accident. There are few coincidences in politics.

How would a Republican in Congress look if he or she shot down a bill the public views as a conservative, pro-Second Amendment measure?

They’ll vote for it, and so will Democrats. And that’s how “cooperation” works in Congress. Rather than “agreeing to disagree,” our betters on Capitol Hill can keep their reputations as public servants while taking steps that push the Constitution further into a realm of illusion and theory that won’t ever really get in the way.

Lifezette reports:

The bill could be rolled into H.R. 38 this week, said Massie, and a vote in the House is expected Wednesday. The reciprocity law would allow people to travel to other states with concealed weapons, so long as they have a permit in their home state.

So while gun owners are excited to get national reciprocity for their concealed weapons — in all 50 states — they won’t like what’s been added to the bill.

“They’re going to get a little bit of gun control in the mix with it,” Massie said on Monday, in a phone call to LifeZette. “States and federal agencies will be coerced to put more names in the database.”

The Senate version of H.R. 4477 is co-sponsored by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). The Senate version will send $625 million over five years to states to expand the national background check database, Massie said.

The congressman said he is perplexed as to why Republican leadership in the House and the Senate is rushing to enhance NICS, when former President Barack Obama used the system to bar gun ownership based on what Social Security reported to the database on mental disabilities […]

The database bill is often nicknamed the Fix-NICS bill. And Massie isn’t the only one complaining.

The Gun Owners of America, an NRA rival, said the Fix-NICS bill will authorize state governments and federal agencies to consider people with unpaid traffic tickets to be fugitives from the law, and thus unable to qualify for approval for firearms ownership.

The database also has had many problems in the past, according to a Friday website post by Erich Pratt, the executive director of Gun Owners of America.

Pratt said 95 percent of the denials of gun rights by the NICS database are “false positives.”

Pratt said the database has prevented 257,000 veterans from owning a gun.

When will you become another “false positive” and lose your Constitutional rights?

If we continue to see Trojans hiding in bills, whose text is not revealed to the public until it’s too late, the short answer is soon.